The Communication Paradox

Victor’s communication paradox was about the problem that, while IT has developed more and more channels of communication for us (WhatsApp, Facebook etc.), growing up has become more and more difficult four young people nowadays and that they experience a lot of stress and problems while developing themselves. Victor called this the Information Paradox which he further explained to me.

The last decade we have created a new world next to the real ‘Physical world’ and ‘Fantasy World’ which can be called the ‘Online’ world and which is always available when you have access to a device with Internet connection. And, when going ‘Online’, you can influence your ‘User Experience’ and create your own environment and manage your content. You can, for example, only invite the friends you like on your Facebook or WhatsApp account or filter the information you like on your screen creating your own virtual world. This world also enables you to watch movies, play games and listen to music on your own and forget the world around you, it’s your unique and individual experience.

The current generation of students are the first-generation students who have grown up with constant access to the Internet. It’s not possible to explaining IT to them without considering their ‘Online’ perspective. And the funny thing is that most teachers have grown up without ICT and learned to use it at a later age. Our students don’t know how the none-connected world looked like 25 years ago before Internet was invented so you could better explain them how communication was done those days than explain how it works now.

You can compare being online with freedom: it doesn’t mean anything to those who have it but once taken away you know what it is! Of course, the new generation has experienced what it is to have no Internet connectivity. For most students this is a threat and creates stress, not an opportunity to relax. The way we communicate has changed, for example: when you take the train everybody is staring at their smartphone, in schools students check their smartphones between lessons instead of talking to each other and at home WhatsApp has replaced picking up the phone.

To investigate how young people use social media Victor asked a group of students two questions: 1) how many posts did you create yourself last week and 2) how many times did you respond to post posted by someone else. Regarding the first question most of them posted rarely something new: on average, only once a week a new post. But replying and sharing is done multiple times per day. Summarizing his findings: young people don’t create content themselves but are busy responding and having an opinion on what others publish online building their online identity.

Direct one to one communication is replaced by this new way of communication and the big difference with the old way is that in the past, when you were talking directly with someone, only the people around you were involved. Nowadays potentially the whole world can read your post which can go viral and become a hype before you know it. So doing something wrong online can have more impact now.

Our whole communication has changed significant and this makes especially young people, who are by nature very unsure, vulnerable for stress and psychological problems. And because your ‘Online World’, which you created yourself, is always available: you can escape from the ‘Real World’ to this ‘Online World’ . And the old ‘Fantasy World’ has become less important and is now underdeveloped at the expense of developing your own creativity. Direct communication is becoming difficult and even has become art like Marina Abramović performance in the MoMA in New York where she is only watching visitors in their eyes: direct none verbal communication reduced to object of art.

The only way to solve this is was developing training courses for young people in old fashioned communication skills and that’s why he was in Sedona to investigate if this course we did could be used. He concluded this was not the case, the format was to old fashioned and would not appeal young people. We did not have much more time to discuss this but we agreed we would in a few weeks and further discuss this, London after all was not so far from Amsterdam.

During my flight back home I had time to think back on what happened since New Years Eve, now two week ago. Next week I had to start working again, boring…

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